Image

Keeping Your Re-Bloom Azaleas Beautiful

Re-Blooming Azaleas (those that bloom 3-4 times per year) are one of the most versatile flowering shrubs available. But, maybe yours aren’t doing as well as you hoped they would.


Here’s 5 reasons why they may not be blooming and how to fix that (info provided by Encore Azaleas)


1. They need 6 hours of light per day – 

morning sun is better than afternoon, and bright dappled light is OK. Without enough light they will be thin and lanky and will not bloom much. Either transplant them to a sunnier spot (at the appropriate time of the year) or prune trees to allow more sunlight through.


2. Bad weather – 

an early season freeze prior to the plant hardening off through fall can damage buds and keep them from blooming. A late freeze in spring can have the same affect on blooms. Unfortunately, there isn’t a remedy for Mother Nature.


3. Pruning improperly – 

If you prune at the wrong time and remove buds you will have no blooms. The best time to prune is immediately after blooming in the spring.


4. Lack of Water – 

Once established they need 1” of water per week in mild climates and more than that here during our summer heat festival. Mulch 2-3” deep to help cool off the roots and retain moisture in the soil around your shrubs.


5. Using the wrong fertilizer – 

Use a fertilizer specifically for azaleas and acid loving plants. Don’t use a lawn fertilizer since it has too much nitrogen (1st number listed) and this will cause the plant to grow leaves instead of flowers.

I am going to add 2 more tips to the list:

6. Don’t plant too deeply – 

dig your hole only as deep as the size of the root ball. You don’t want the plant to settle and be in a bowl that will hold water. Some suggest leaving an inch or so of the rootball above ground level and then cover with mulch.

7. Plant in well-drained soil – 

azaleas do not want to be in soil that does not drain well. They prefer soil that will dry out between watering. Too much water will make the plant weak, and eventually branches and sections will begin to die. Yellowing leaves is a sign that your plant is getting too much water.

Follow these suggestions and enjoy the beauty of reblooming azaleas year round.

Read More

How To Change The Color Of Your Hydrangea

The pH level of your soil dictates what color your hydrangea will be.  Here’s the cool part – you can change the pH level of your soil. 

First test the pH level of your soil to determine if you have alkaline or acidic soil.  Alkaline soil (7.0 or higher) creates pink hydrangeas blooms and Acidic soil (lower than 6.0) creates blue blooms.

Add lime to the soil to create an Alkaline soil condition and pink blooms.

Add aluminum sulfate to the soil to create an Acid soil condition and blue blooms.

Read More

All About The Endless Summer Hydrangea

This brightly-colored hydrangea revolutionized the way hydrangeas are used in landscapes. ‘Endless Summer’ was the first hydrangea discovered that blooms on the previous year’s woody stems and the new season’s growth.

A whole series of Endless Summer Hydrangeas followed “the Original”.  There are now 5 varieties:

The Original – Large, mop-head blooms in either blue or pink depending upon your soil’s pH level. It grows to 3 x 5 feet tall and wide and is a rounded shaped plant.

Twist-n-Shout – was the first re-blooming lacecap hydrangea in deep pink or periwinkle blue (depending on soil pH).  The stems are red which ad even more interest to the plant and it grows to 3-5’ tall and 3-4’ wide.

BloomStruck – Depending on the pH or your soil, it blooms rose-pink or purple flowers.  It has red/purple stems and red veins on the leaves and grows to 3-4’ tall and 4-5’ wide.

Blushing Bride – has white semi-double florets, which change to blush pink or Carolina blue depending on the pH of your soil.  It grows to 3-6’ tall and 3-6’ wide.

Summer Crush – the newest addition to the family this has bright, raspberry red or neon purple blooms, again dependent upon the pH or your soil.  It is very bright!.  It is smaller growing 18-36” hight to 18-36” wide.  Great in containers or in the ground.

Plant these in a shady spot and be prepared to water daily – especially once we reach 90+ degrees.  This series will not disappoint if you do your part. 

Disease-resistant and hardy, this hydrangea offers color from spring until fall.  Versatile and beautiful, the ‘Endless Summer’ hydrangea is a great addition to almost any landscape.

Read More

Grafting: What is it? Why is it done?

Most are familiar with the term grafting, but do you know why most fruit trees, roses, camellias and countless other plants are grafted?  Without getting all scientific, I’ll not only explain why and what but also what to watch for in your grafted plants.

What is grafting?  It is the joining of 2 plants into one.  A grafted plant uses the roots and the bottom portion of one plant (called the rootstock) and the top part from another plant (called the scion).  All the top growth of a grafted plant comes from the scion.

The graft is easy to see on many plants – it can appear as a knot at the base of a rose bush or a crook in the trunk near ground level of an immature fruit tree. 

Why graft?  The grafting union allows the combining of characteristics of both plants to form a superior plant.  Rootstocks can contribute traits to improve yield, cold or drought hardiness and disease resistance.  The scion is usually a young shoot or bud from a plant with great flavor, color or disease resistance. 

It also is a reliable method of reproducing plants that do not grow true to type from seed. 

What to watch for: 

  • Suckers from the rootstock or roots.  They will appear below the graft and need to be removed.  They are not grown from the scion and will not perform the same way – bloom color could be different, growth rate is usually accelerated.
  • Don’t bury the graft joint underground.  The rootstock will grow its own plant and the scion will grow its own roots.  The plant will not be the same once this occurs.
  • If the scion dies the root stock can still be alive and will send up shoots (suckers).  This growth is not from the scion and will perform very differently.

Grafting dates back over 4000 years and there are many methods of grafting and all have their specific uses.  New strains of plants are developed this way and the benefits are many. 

If you want to try grafting yourself, watch a few YouTube videos, follow along and graft away.  It’s a great project to do with the kiddos, they can help and watch the new plant grow.

Read More

Transplanting Trees + Shrubs

Winter is the best time to transplant established trees and shrubs with December and January being the best months to do so in our area.  February is too “iffy” due to early springs we experience in East Texas. 

Transplanting a shrub or tree is different than an initial planting which can be done any time.  Transplanting means you are cutting the roots of the plant and this should only be done while they are dormant and not actively growing.

Transplants die due to improper removal or installation.  Younger plants transplant better than older ones and deciduous plants/trees survive transplanting more often than evergreens.  Transplanting causes stress for plants so minimizing this is the goal.

It is best to only move a plant when in it’s dormant state, not when it has budded out for spring or in full growth during the summer.

How do I transplant correctly?

  • The condition of the root system is the most important part of transplanting.  Dig carefully and keep as much soil around each plant’s root system as possible.
  • Some experts like Neil Sperry suggest you dig the new hole only as deep and wide as needed to hold the soil ball.  Others say the hole should be 2-3 times the width of the root ball and should be backfilled with amended soil.  I’ve seen it done both ways successfully.
  • Set the plant at the same depth at which it was growing.
  • Water the plant thoroughly.
  • Here’s the hard part – thin and trim 40-50% of the plant to compensate for the loss of roots.  If you don’t the plant stands less chance of surviving the transplant.
  • Mulch over the top of the exposed ground to help hold in moisture.
  • Stake transplanted trees for a period of time to help them stay upright.

If you have a shrub or tree that needs to be transplanted due to it being too large for an area or if it should have been planted in sun vs shade or vice versa then move it.  The plant will never perform well if left in the wrong spot.

If you have specific questions, send us pictures or give us a call. 

Read More

Pruning Trees + Shrubs Series: Abelias

Abelia are known for their gracefully arching branches that are covered with flowers from June to October.  Pruning abelia plants isn’t a necessity – you can allow them to grow freely.  However, pruning will keep your plant compact and neat looking.  Although there are many different varieties available there is no difference in pruning techniques.

The best time to prune Abelias is in late winter or early spring.  Their flowers are formed on new growth (newly grown branches), so you don’t have to worry about losing blooms by cutting branches at the correct time of the year. 

If you have an older abelia that needs rejuvenating, you can prune it to the ground or prune 1/3 of the oldest stems to the ground each year before spring growth begins.  Choose the tallest branches on the interior of the plant and continue pruning stems in a random pattern to keep the shrub natural-looking.  This will promote new, compact growth.

How and What to Prune

– Prune dead stems to the ground.

– If only part of the branch is dead, cut below the dead wood and just above a lateral branch or bud.

– Long, leggy stems called water spouts (we prefer crazy arms) can be pruned to the ground any time.

– Prune the tips of all branches to maintain an even look.

– Use hand pruners for stems less than ½” in diameter and lopping shears for larger branches.

After the threat of frost has passed apply a good granular fertilizer to your abelia making sure to water it in thoroughly.  This will promote new growth for later spring and into summer.

If we have a scorcher of a summer and your abelia looks “tired” in August or September, prune the tips of all the branches.  Once the temps drop out of the high 90s you will begin to see new growth appear and a happy, healthy plant full of new blooms that will last until the first frost. 

Read More

Camellias: Sasanqua vs. Japonica

Camellias are showy plants, offering long lasting blooms during the late fall and winter, lasting well into the spring.  Their large flowers brighten up your landscape during those winter months when little else is blooming.  The blooms are profuse and cover the entire bush making it the superstar of any landscape. 

There are numerous species of Camellias but the most popular varieties grown are Camellia Sasasanqua and Camellia Japonica.   These 2 varieties have similarities in their flower color but bloom at different times of the season.  Camellia Sasanqua will bloom from late Fall through early January and Camellia Japonica will bloom January through early Spring.

Camellias are known as a shade loving plants, but the Sasanqua can handle some sun.  It’s smaller than the Japonica in overall size (6’ tall and wide to 10’ tall and 6’ wide) and has smaller leaves and flowers.  Blooms are 3” – 4” in diameter, are sweet smelling and usually have ruffled edges with a burst of yellow color in their center. 

Japonicas prefer shade and are taller (12’+ for old mature plants) than Sasanquas.  Their flowers boast more petals, are often 5” wide and are stunning.  A single bush can have well over 100 flowers for weeks, blooming consistently from January through early spring.    

Both varieties offer striation or multicolored blooms, but most camellias bloom in one of three colors – white, pink or red, – in many shades from the palest shell pink to rose pink to bright red. 

These slow growing evergreens are relatively care-free.  They should only require pruning after they finish blooming.  Fertilize at the same time and again in mid-summer.  Camellias are prone to Scale and treating yearly with a horticultural spray or drench will help control these pests.

Consider adding camellias to your landscape if you haven’t already.  By planting both varieties you can enjoy the “Queen of winter flowers” from late fall through Spring.

Read More

13 GREAT Groundcovers

Do you have bare spots in your yard where grass won’t grow?   Under a large tree that is too shady for grass?  A slope or steep area?  If you’ve answered “YES!” to any of these questions, you may need a groundcover to solve your issue.

What is a groundcover? The definitive answer would be “Any one of a group of low-lying plants with a creeping, spreading habit that are used to cover sections of ground with minimal maintenance.”

Groundcovers can be used in so many ways:   

  • mass plantings in your actual landscape,
  • adding color to a rock garden,
  • use in skinny walkway beds,
  • introducing new colors and textures to your garden beds,  
  • erosion area

Ajuga

Also known as ‘Bugleweed’

This evergreen perennial (stays green all year) has a ground-hugging habit of growth. Ajuga sends up beautiful electric blue blooms that rise above its foliage from mid to late spring. It attracts butterflies but not deer. Ajuga loves to spread, plant in part-shade, and watch her thrive!

Japanese Ardisia

Also known as ‘Maleberry’

Japanese Ardisia shows off a rich, green color and dainty clusters of pink star-shaped flowers at the ends of its branches during spring, and red berries in mid fall. This multi-stemmed evergreen shrub is perfect for areas that are shaded, moist and cool. Reaching a spread of 3 feet, this part-shade to full shade lover makes for an excellent groundcover (and an excellent houseplant!).

Sedge

Also known as ‘Carex’

Sedge is a vigorous, mound-forming evergreen with striking, grassy foliage. The gracefully arching stems of this plant bring a fine and delicate addition to any garden. This groundcover is relatively low-maintenance, and does well in partial shade or full shade, and spreads up to 16 inches. Many native varieties of Sedge cultivar are right here among us in East Texas! Sedge makes a great border edging, mass planting, and also works well in mixed containers.

Coral Bells

Also known as ‘Heuchera’

Coral Bells is an evergreen perennial with tall flower stalks held atop a low mound of foliage. These tiny, delicate flowers come in as many colors as its foliage does, from lime green to purple! This low-growing plant is relatively low-maintenance and a good choice for attracting butterflies. Coral Bells are perfect for containers, mass plantings, borders and rock gardens. This evergreen can take full sun or full shade and can spread up to 18 inches.

Japanese Pachysandra

Showing out in a rich, emerald color, Pachysandra is an evergreen that looks amazing year-round. Spreading up to 1 ½ feet at maturity, this perennial does best in part shade to morning sun. The bold, dark green leaves make for a fantastic groundcover, or border for walkways. Small, bright white flowers appear in early spring – though not particularly showy, the flowers offer an ornate addition against the green background.

‘Blue Rug’ Juniper

This ground-hugging Juniper features silvery-blue foliage that takes on a nearly purple tinge during winter and produces blue berries from late spring to late winter. A dense, multi-stemmed evergreen, ‘Blue Rug’ Juniper is extremely adaptable and hardy – making for a great groundcover or border, or even trailing over walls. A lover of full sun to part shade, this Juniper can reach a spread of up to 7 feet!

Creeping Phlox

Also known as ‘Moss Phlox’

Creeping Phlox puts on a show of bright, cherry red, blue or white star-shaped flowers at the ends of the stems from early to late spring. It’s tiny, needle-like leaves remain green in color throughout the year. This evergreen blanket of flowers does best in full sun to part-shade, which makes it perfect for border edging, mass planting or general ground cover. At maturity, Creeping Phlox can spread up to 18 inches.

Sedum

Ground cover sedums are a form of succulents that are winter hardy and stay green throughout the year.  These are heat loving plants that grow well in full sun or partial sun and are drought tolerant! They come in a variety of colors, some have variegated leaves and bloom in late Summer through Fall.  Use in rock gardens, as ground cover in landscape beds, as spillers in containers or in hanging baskets. 

Delosperma

Also known as ‘Ice Plant’

This is a multi-purpose plant with succulent type foliage.  It blooms in bright colors from Spring through Fall, stays green throughout the winter, loves full sun and heat but will also perform in partial sun.  Good for rock gardens, a spiller in containers, and in hanging baskets.

Standard Mondo Grass

This old standby is an evergreen perennial with grass like stems and small purple flower spikes which bloom throughout the Spring and Summer.  It is slow growing and spreads through runners.  It can be easily divided and moved to other areas and requires minimal care once established.   Mass plantings are striking – giving the appearance of a deep green lawn.  Plant in shade or part shade.

Asian Jasmine

This woody stemmed favorite grows well in a variety of soils and conditions.  It is a great erosion control on slopes and on the side of creeks or ditches.  It can be cut with a weedeater or even with a mower set on the highest setting if it becomes too tall for the area.  Plant in partial sun to full sun.

English Ivy

Another shade loving groundcover which keeps its dark green color year-round.  This plant runs along the ground and sets roots along the stem.  It can become invasive and grow up into trees if not contained. 

Creeping Thyme

Evergreen flowering herb that is covered with a blanket of pink-purple blossoms in the Spring.  It can handle some light foot traffic and reaches a height of 3”.  Grows in full sun to partial shade.

Read More

Low Growing Shrubs for Almost Any Area!

Keeping with the theme of low growing shrubs here are two groups – those for shady spots and for sunny to partial sun areas.

Shade:

mojopittosporum

Mojo Pittosporum – Evergreen, low mounding shrub with light green and cream  variegated leaves.  It is salt tolerant, deer resistant, and has orange smelling blossoms in the Spring.

soft-caress-mahonia-full-bush-600x600_1

Soft Caress Mahonia –  This airy plant has bamboo-like foliage and bright yellow flowers at the top of the plant that bloom in early winter.

eversheen

Carex or Sedge –  Mounding, grass like plant that can be used as accents or planted in multiples to give year round color to a shady garden.  Most varieties offer variegated or striped leaves.

20070710-106

Wheelers Dwarf Pittosporum  Dark green, glossy leafed, mounding shrub that requires almost no trimming.

dscn2764.jpg

Dwarf Hydrangea – Enjoy beautiful Hydrangea blossoms on smaller plant varieties   available now.  In blue, pink, or white, they will brighten up your garden.

 

 

 

Sun to Partial Sun:

littlejohnbottlebrush.jpg

Little John Bottlebrush – The bright red flowers which resemble a bottle cleaning brush is where this plant gets its name.  It blooms intermittently throughout the Spring and into the Fall.  The foliage is narrow and blue green and is deer resistant.

another rebloomer

Multi-Blooming Azaleas – multiple colors (red, white, pinks, and purple) are available in plants 2’ – 3’ tall.  They will bloom 3-4 times during the year bringing color to your landscape or containers.

anthonywaterer

Dwarf Spirea – Several varieties are available with different leaf color – dark green, lime green, golden yellow – with blooms during Spring and Summer.

rose-drift-red-400

Drift Roses – One of the most popular shrubs.  They bloom from Spring to late Fall in a variety of colors – red, peach, apricot, white and pink.

uuid133-1-f

Dwarf Abelia – Evergreen foliage in either variegated or solid green colors.   Cluster of small, fragrant, white flowers bloom from late Spring to early Fall.

Read More

Top 5 Shrubs to Use for Screening Purposes

  1. Elaeagnus – terrible name, great plant!  The silver-green leaf color gives you great contrast in your landscape.  Highly drought tolerant once established and can
    elaeagnus

    Elaeagnus

    handle almost any soil conditions.  They grow quickly to a 8’x8’ and taller and thrive in full sun or part sun.  They are DEER RESISTANT too!!

  2. Southern Wax Myrtle – Olive-green aromatic foliage makes this plant stand out along with the bluish berries
    wax myrtle (2)

    Wax Myrtle

    produced by the female plants. The standard size will reach 15 feet tall while the dwarf species reaches 6-8 feet tall.  It is drought tolerant once established and grows well in both moist and dry soil conditions.  n full sun or part shade.  They are DEER RESISTANT too!!

  3. Pineapple Guava – Beautiful, exotic red and white flowers bloom on this large shrub in the spring, followed by guava fruit in the fall. The leaves are light green,
    pineapple guava

    Pineapple Guava

    leathery with soft gray undersides.  It will grow to about 15’ – 20’ tall in full sun or partial sun.  Deer do not seem to bother these plants.

  4. Nellie R Stevens Holly – Very attractive holly with dark green, leathery foliage. Dense branching
    nellie r stevens

    ‘Nellie R. Stevens’ Holly

    makes it an excellent hedge screen.  It produces large, bright orange-red berries in late Fall.  Fast growing tree/shrub reaching heights of 15’- 25’.  Grows well in sun or partial sun in both dry and moist soil conditions.

  5. Leyland Cypress – A fast-growing coniferous evergreen tree – up to 3’ of growth per year. Has a natural Christmas tree shape but
    leyland-cypress-5

    Leyland Cypress

    can be grown close together and trimmed as hedges.  Prefers full sun for best performance.  This tree can reach 50+ feet if left untrimmed.

Read More
Translate »
0