Planting

January is an excellent month for planting shrubs.

Transplanting

Shrubs are as dormant as they will get this month and that makes it an ideal time to transplant.

Fertilizing

No shrubs should be fertilized in January

Pest Control

Winter is an excellent time to apply horticultural oil sprays to shrubs that are prone to scale. Do not spray if the nighttime low is predicted below 40 degrees.

Pruning

You may prune just about anything except spring- flowering shrubs during January.

Watering

There is generally no need to water established shrubs in January. Newly planted shrubs should be watered in thoroughly and thereafter regular rainfall should give them enough water. If a hard freeze is expected and the soil is dry, water thoroughly before the freeze arrives.

Planting

February is a great month to plant shrubs.

Transplanting

The cooler weather of this month continues to offer good transplanting conditions.

Fertilizing

It is still a little early for fertilizing most shrubs

Pest Control

If you did not apply oil sprays to shrubs to control scale in January you can do so this month.

Pruning

Prune summer-flowering shrubs now if you need to (do not prune gardenias or hydrangeas now).

Watering

Little additional water is needed this time of year since shrubs are mostly dormant and the weather is cool with adequate rain.

Planting

Spring months are fun months to plant new shrubs in the garden. It is a good time to replace any shrubs that were damaged through the winter.

Transplanting

Although most shrubs are coming out of dormancy you can still safely transplant since the temperatures are still on the mild side.

Fertilizing

This is the month to fertilize shrubs. Apply fertilizer evenly around the plants. They can be applied directly over the mulch or you can pull back the mulch apply the fertilizer and replace the mulch.

Pest Control

Aphids make their appearance on the new growth of a variety of shrubs this time of year. Also, leaf spot diseases may attack new growth on some shrubs.

Pruning

Finish up pruning summer-flowering shrubs by the end of this month. Do not be too hasty to prune growth that has been damaged by winter freezes. Wait and watch shrubs as they begin to grow and look at which branches are sprouting. Some branches that lost all their leaves due to freezing weather may look dead but aren’t.

Watering

Newly planted shrubs will require watering in. Use of a root stimulator when planting shrubs helps them establish faster prior to the arrival of the heat of summer.

Planting

April is a good month to plant container grown shrubs. It is also the last month that you should plant balled-and-burlapped shrubs. Little time is left for them to make root growth prior to the arrival of hot weather.

Transplanting

Only transplant shrubs when necessary. If you must transplant, make sure to dig as many roots as you can and keep the plants well-watered.

Fertilizing

Fertilize your shrubs now if you didn’t do so last month.

Pest Control

Watch for aphids on new growth and flower buds. Look for azalea lace bugs – tiny white spots on the upper surface of the leaves and dark brown specks on the back. Caterpillars will chew holes in new foliage. Powdery mildew may occur if the weather is warm and humid – look for a fine, white powdery coating on the foliage.

Pruning

Prune spring-flowering shrubs any time after they finish blooming.

Watering

Newly planted shrubs need ½ to 1 inch of rain every 5 – 7 days. If Mother Nature doesn’t supply this amount of rain, then it is up to you to do supplemental watering.

Planting

Although the weather is warming up you can still plant container grown plants successfully. Just use a root stimulator and make sure the plant is watered adequately throughout the summer.

Transplanting

This is not a good time to transplant due to the increased heat.

Fertilizing

You may notice the leaves of your shrubs turning yellow. This is due to a deficiency of iron. By fertilizing with an iron rich fertilizer, the plants will return to their healthy green color quickly.

Pest Control

Watch for signs of pest problems. If you need help identifying a problem, give us a call.

Pruning

About the only shrubs you wouldn’t prune now are those that bloom in summer.

Watering

Shrubs absorb water faster from the soil as temperatures rise. Shrubs planted within the last six months may need to be watered once or twice a week whenever beds are dry.

Planting

Although the temperature continues to rise, container grown plants can still be planted successfully. More care and watering are needed to ensure the plant will grow during this time of the year.

Transplanting

It should not be attempted during this time.

Fertilizing

Established plants should have been fertilized in March or April. Young shrubs may be fertilized in June or July to encourage additional growth.

Pest Control

Several products are available to control powdery mildew and whiteflies that are prevalent this time of year.

Pruning

You should finish any extensive pruning on spring-flowering shrubs this month.

Watering

Watch for drought stress on shrubs planted with the last six months if adequate rainfall has not occurred ( ½ to 1 inch per week). Symptoms to look for include wilting, scorched leaf edges, dull, brown or dropping leaves.

Planting

You can still plant shrubs successfully during the increasing heat. Just remember to monitor them closely and water them frequently.

Transplanting

This is not a good month to transplant.

Fertilizing

Fertilize established shrubs that were last fed in the spring. Especially shrubs that you want to grow as much and as fast as possible.

Pest Control

Sooty Mold – a black deposit on foliage indicates the presence of sucking insects. It is not attacking the shrub but is living off the excretions produced by the sucking insects such as aphids, whiteflies and scales.

Pruning

This is the last month for pruning spring-flowering shrubs, do not prune camellias – their flower buds for fall and winter bloom are already set.

Watering

Heat stresses shrubs and even well-established plants will need to be watered if rain does not occur for several days. Maintaining 3 to 4 inches of mulch year-round will help hold as much moisture in the soil as possible.

Planting

Just as in June and July you can plant successfully in the heat of the summer if you water your shrubs and monitor them for drought stress. A simple soaker hose on newly planted shrubs with an automatic faucet timer makes it easy to maintain adequate water for your beds.

Transplanting

This is not a good month to transplant.

Fertilizing

August isn’t a good month for fertilizing plants.

Pest Control

Watch for spider mites on azaleas and junipers – they cause foliage to become faded and junipers will turn brown when infected. You can detect them by placing a piece of white paper under the suspected area and brush the leaves. Look for tiny black specks to fall onto the white paper. If you see these specks moving, then you have spider mites. They are treatable.

Pruning

Finish shearing hedges or pruning shrubs not grown for flowers. Do not prune camellias this month.

Watering

Provide deep, thorough irrigation with sprinklers or soaker hoses.

Planting

Temperatures are still hot but just like June, July and August container grown shrubs can successfully be planted during this time of the year.

Transplanting

September is not a good time to transplant.

Fertilizing

For plants with off color this is usually a god moth to fertilize one last time during the active growing season. Use a slow- release fertilizer not a quick-release one.

Pest Control

The same pests that have been around all summer may continue this month.

Pruning

Do not prune any winter or spring flowering shrubs currently.

Watering

Keep up the good work in applying water to your plants. This should be the last month of hot temperatures for the year.

Planting

As the weather cools container grown plants can be planted without the fear of stress due to high temperatures of the last few months.

Transplanting

It is still too early to transplant unless the weather has been unusually cool.

Fertilizing

No fertilizer is necessary this time of year for established shrubs.

Pest Control

Azalea lace bugs will be active through November.

Pruning

This is normally not a good time of year to prune shrubs.

Watering

October can be one of our driest months. Although the temperature is cooler your shrubs still need at least ½ to 1 inch of water every 5 to 7 days. If the rain doesn’t fall, then supplemental watering is necessary.

Planting

Both container plants and balled-and-burlapped plants can be planted at this time of the year.

Transplanting

This is the beginning of transplanting season.

Fertilizing

No fertilizer should be applied to shrubs this month.

Pest Control

Few pest problems will exist this time of year. Watch for scale on camellias, hollies, euonymus – the cool season is the perfect time to treat this with oil sprays.

Pruning

Be cautious about what you prune this time of year. The mild temperatures of November don’t send shrubs into dormancy. Pruning can stimulate growth which will be damaged by the winter cold. Spring flowering plants do not need to be pruned at this time of year.

Watering

Established shrubs should not require watering in excess of the rainfall received. Newly planted shrubs will require watering more frequently if the weather is mild and dry.

Planting

Shrubs planted now have 5 months to establish themselves before the heat sets in – thus enabling them to perform better during the summer months.

Transplanting

Can be done now through the end of February.

Fertilizing

No fertilizer should be applied to shrubs this time of year.

Pest Control

Little pest control is necessary this month except for scale infestations.

Pruning

Most shrubs should be dormant by mid-December and can be pruned without stimulating new growth. DO NOT prune any shrubs that bloom in the spring since they have already begun to set their buds.

Watering

Mother Nature usually makes watering established shrubs unnecessary. Newly planted or transplanted shrubs need watering if the weather is not keeping the soil moist.