Planting

Perennials can be planted this month.

Transplanting

January is a good month to transplant perennials.

Fertilizing

Few perennials are in active growth during the winter. This is not the best time to fertilize them.

Pest Control

Insect and disease problems are a minimum this time of year.

Pruning

Cut back and remove old, dead upper portions of dormant perennials to keep your garden looking more attractive.

Watering

Cool/cold temperatures, typical rainy weather, and the dormant condition of many perennials make watering unnecessary.

Planting

It’s time to gear up for major planting this month.

Transplanting

You can dig up and move or divide perennials now.

Fertilizing

Perennials that are in active growth may be fertilized in late February.

Pest Control

Generally, no major insect or disease problems in February. Aphids may be seen on new growth.

Pruning

Remove old, dead growth on perennials now if you have not already done so.

Watering

Water-in newly planted perennials thoroughly. Cool, moist weather usually means that little watering will need to be done.

Planting

Perennials may not look like much when you purchase them this month. Just imagine how they will look when they bloom in 2 to 3 months – or even at the end of the summer.

Transplanting

Finish up transplanting and dividing perennials as soon as possible.

Fertilizing

Established perennials should be fertilized this month.

Pest Control

Snails and slugs may be active, get an early start on control and don’t let their populations build. Control aphids, caterpillars with approved aids.

Pruning

Not much pruning is necessary during active growing periods.

Watering

Apply water slowly over time with a sprinkler or soaker hose to ensure a deep thorough watering when adequate rain is not received.

Planting

You can plant perennials from seed in containers and transplant them into the garden in the fall or early next spring. This month is a great time to plant perennials.

Transplanting

You can still transplant perennials during this month.

Fertilizing

Fertilize perennials plantings if you have not done so

Pest Control

Watch out for caterpillars, beetles and aphids. Look for powdery mildew – a white, powdery coating on the leaves of perennials – common disease. Gray mold may attack flowers and foliage during cool, wet weather, causing tissue to brown and rot with a gray fuzzy growth on it.

Pruning

Deadhead regularly to keep plants attractive and in some cases encourage more flowers.

Watering

Deep watering is especially important this time of year if enough rain does not fall.

Planting

You can plant perennials this time of year if you make sure to water deeply to protect them from the heat.

Transplanting

It is risky to dig and transplant or divide perennials this late in the year.

Fertilizing

Most of your fertilizer applications should be finished by now. If you haven’t fertilized yet do so now.

Pest Control

Most perennial plantings are not constantly plagued by pests.

Pruning

Continue to deadhead.

Watering

Soaker hoses are an effective way to water perennial beds without getting water on the flowers and foliage.

Planting

Perennials growing in containers can be planted now.

Transplanting

It is too hot to dig, divide and transplant perennials now.

Fertilizing

Another application of fertilizer may be made to beds that were last fertilized in March or April.

Pest Control

Watch for caterpillars chewing holes in leaves. The whitefly can be difficult to control if populations get out of hand. The adults are small, snow whiteflies; the larvae appear as small disks under the leaves. Aphids cluster on new growth and flower buds sucking the sap from the plant. Spider mites can be devastating during hot dry weather and snails and slugs love plants that have succulent leaves that grow in the shade.

Pruning

Continue to dead head spent flowers.

Watering

Water deeply and thoroughly as needed when rain has not occurred.

Planting

Use a root stimulator when planting perennials during the hot months of summer.

Transplanting

It is too hot to dig, divide and move existing plants.

Fertilizing

Only perennials in active growth should be fertilized.

Pest Control

Continue to watch for the same pests as you did in June.

Pruning

Dead head flowers to keep your garden looking fresher. Use plant supports to help hold up weight of the plants and blooms.

Watering

Perennial beds require more water than what we can do by hand. Use soaker hoses drip irrigation or sprinklers and leave them on long enough for the water to moisten the soil about 4 to 6 inches down.

Planting

Plant salvias so they can flower in the fall and early winter

Transplanting

It is still too hot to move and transplant perennials.

Fertilizing

Fall blooming perennials need to be fertilized this month to help them have an outstanding fall bloom.

Pest Control

Whiteflies can be a major problem in late summer. Spider mites thrive in hot, dry late-summer conditions.

Pruning

Cut back and remove dead flower stalks and unattractive growth on perennials along with deadheading regularly.

Watering

If you notice plants wilting you are waiting too long before watering your garden.

Planting

Perennials started from seeds earlier this year are probably large enough to go into the garden now. You can also plant container grown perennials during this month.

Transplanting

Daylilies and iris may be divided now.

Fertilizing

Perennials that have finished blooming for the year should not be fertilized now. Any perennials showing nutrient deficiencies may be fertilized but use a water soluble fertilizer to deliver nutrients immediately.

Pest Control

Pests have had all summer to build up population levels. Be on the lookout and treat with the proper aids.

Pruning

Continue deadheading and remove any spent stalks, etc.

Watering

Water as needed using sprinkler, soaker hoses or drip irrigation.

Planting

October is a great month to plant container grown perennials.

Transplanting

Many perennials can be dug and transplanted over the next couple of months.

Fertilizing

Water in newly planted perennials with a water-soluble fertilizer mixed half strength.

Pest Control

As the weather cools off diseases should diminish. Watch for armyworms – large, dark caterpillars that can chew up a perennial plant in no time.

Pruning

Continue to deadhead and cut back spent growth

Watering

Cooler weather doesn’t always mean more rain. Watering is still needed if it does not rain regularly.

Planting

November is a great month for planting perennials in the garden.

Transplanting

This month is one of the best for transplanting perennials.

Fertilizing

Fertilizer is usually not needed at this time of the year.

Pest Control

Watch for caterpillars, aphids, snails, and slugs and treat if necessary.

Pruning

Tall growing, fall-blooming perennials may need to be staked. Deadhead perennials that are in bloom as needed. After they finish flowering, most should be cut back hard. Cut back and remove dead flower stalks and unattractive foliage from perennials winding down for the year.

Watering

Water plants as needed to maintain a moist soil if weather is dry

Planting

Perennials aren’t usually planted in December

Transplanting

Most transplanting and division of perennials is done prior to December

Fertilizing

No fertilizer is required this month.

Pest Control

Most perennials are dormant in the winter so there are no pest problems

Pruning

Cut back fall-blooming perennials that have finished blooming. Cut back any foliage that has been damaged by freeze or frost and apply 3 to 4-inch mulch over the roots and base of the plant.

Watering

Cool weather and regular rainfall make it unlikely that additional watering is necessary.